Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior
Journal Club 7_ Church Leaders’ Views of Obesity Prevention Efforts for Children and Youth
Leaders’ Experiences in Planning, Implementing, and Evaluating Complex Public Health Nutrition Interventions
Journal Club 5_ Process Evaluation of Strong Hearts, Healthy Communities_ A Rural Community-Based Cardiovascular Disease
Supporting Development of Campaign to Increase Physical Activity Among Low-Income, Urban, Diverse Inactive Teens
Journal Club 3_ Reasons for Late-Night Eating and Willingness to Change - A Qualitative Study in Pregnant Black Women
Journal Club 2: Environmental, Social, and Structural Constraints for Health Behavior

Journal Club 2: Environmental, Social, and Structural Constraints for Health Behavior

March 9, 2020

About the Webinar

This presentation will discuss young urban black women’s perceptions of the environmental, social, and structural constraints for health behaviour. These findings form part of the qualitative formative work conducted as part of the Healthy Life Trajectories Initiative (HeLTI). HeLTI is a 4-country study that aims to develop and evaluate an integrated continuum of care intervention starting preconception and extending through pregnancy, infancy, and childhood with the ultimate goal of reducing childhood adiposity and the risk for noncommunicable disease.

Related JNEB article. 

About the Presenter

Catherine Draper, PhD
Dr. Draper is, at heart, a social scientist who works broadly in the field of life course epidemiology. She has a particular interest in young children and in the development and evaluation of community-based interventions to promote health behaviours, with a focus on physical activity and dietary behaviours. Dr. Draper's work is conducted in South Africa, predominantly in low-income settings. Although her current research uses mixed methods, her background is in qualitative research, and she incorporates qualitative research methods strongly in her intervention work.

Journal Club 1: Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Free Summer Meal Participation Among Parents in New York City

Journal Club 1: Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Free Summer Meal Participation Among Parents in New York City

March 2, 2020

This presentation will discuss the development, implementation, and findings of a qualitative study about free summer meal participation in New York City. The utility of conducting qualitative research in this context will be discussed, as well as the challenges encountered. Findings regarding the various benefits and barriers to summer meal participation experienced by lower income parents in New York will be presented, and the perceived social and psychological benefits to summer meals will be highlighted.

Related JNEB article. 

About the Presenter

Allison Kannam, BA, Tufts University
Allison Kannam is a Research Assistant at the Research & Evaluation Group at Public Health Management Corporation in Philadelphia. She completed her B.A. in Community Health at Tufts University, where she conducted research about free summer meal programs. Allison currently conducts evaluations of public health programs on a variety of topics, including nutrition education and tobacco control. She is a member of the American Public Health Association.

Aging Well and Improving Quality of Life Through Community Programs
Panel on H Index/Impact Factor - Cornerstone of Your Career
Future Considerations for Nutrition Education: Motivational Interviewing and Telehealth

Future Considerations for Nutrition Education: Motivational Interviewing and Telehealth

December 19, 2019

This session will provide basic information on the function of telehealth and its use in medicine and nutrition. The evidence that supports the use of telehealth will be addressed as well as different ways the nutrition profession is utilizing it. In addition, the basics of motivational interviewing as a patient-centered approach and the benefits for both the patients and the provider will be discussed. Finally, we will discuss how can these two up-and-coming approaches to patient-centered care be utilized together for improved patient outcomes.

This webinar is sponsored by the University of New England.